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News & Events
October 03, 2014
Today's guest is Mark Rotteveel, developer of JayBird, Firebird JDBC driver, and speaker at Firebird Conference 2014.

— Mark, why do you think people will be interested most of all in your presentation/talk?
 
— I have two talks scheduled. My first talk is about the current state of development of Jaybird, and the changes implemented (and to be implemented) for Jaybird 3.0. I think this is interesting for people who use Jaybird and want to know more about the upcoming changes. My second talk is about using Hibernate and jOOQ to query a Firebird database from Java without having to deal with the low-level JDBC operations. Hibernate is a ORM mapper, while jOOQ is — besides a (light-weight) ORM mapper — a Domain Specific Language (DSL) library for building queries with compile time checks. Both are also useful to bridge dialect differences between various databases.
Although introductory, I think this is interesting for application developers, even when their target platform isn't Java.
 
— What do you like most of all in Firebird? And what is your most  favourite feature/improvement in Firebird 3?
 
I think the key thing about Firebird is its simplicity and small footprint, install it and you are — basically — good to go. I think my favorite new feature in Firebird 3 are the window functions. They provide much needed extensions for analytical queries.
Today's guest is Mark Rotteveel, developer of JayBird, Firebird JDBC driver, and speaker at Firebird Conference 2014.

— Mark, why do you think people will be interested most of all in your presentation/talk?
 
— I have two talks scheduled. My first talk is about the current state of development of Jaybird, and the changes implemented (and to be implemented) for Jaybird 3.0. I think this is interesting for people who use Jaybird and want to know more about the upcoming changes. My second talk is about using Hibernate and jOOQ to query a Firebird database from Java without having to deal with the low-level JDBC operations. Hibernate is a ORM mapper, while jOOQ is — besides a (light-weight) ORM mapper — a Domain Specific Language (DSL) library for building queries with compile time checks. Both are also useful to bridge dialect differences between various databases.
Although introductory, I think this is interesting for application developers, even when their target platform isn't Java.
 
— What do you like most of all in Firebird? And what is your most  favourite feature/improvement in Firebird 3?
 
I think the key thing about Firebird is its simplicity and small footprint, install it and you are — basically — good to go. I think my favorite new feature in Firebird 3 are the window functions. They provide much needed extensions for analytical queries.
September 28, 2014
 The next guest is Paul Reeves (IBPhoenix).
 
— Paul, why do you think people will be interested most of all in your presentations?
 
— Well, I've always been fascinated by trying to measure firebird performance. This year I've spent quite a bit of time working on a test harness that produces consistent output, and above all, a database to store and analyse the data produced by the tests. The results are quite surprising and to me at least, very interesting. I'm certainly enjoying putting the presentation together and hopefully it will be enjoyable for people to sit through.
 
— What do you like most of all in Firebird?
 
— The pace of development. I know we seem to be behind schedule on v3 but I'm barely up to speed with the new features that have been added in v2.n. A lot of the things that used to be difficult back in the day (I've been using Firebird since IB4) are so easy now. The way text blobs can be converted to and from strings, the way sql statements can be constructed on the fly in stored procedures, the fact that domains can now be used consistently in SPs — these are just a few of the things that make database development easier. And of course there are monitoring tables, db and txn triggers. And loads more stuff besides. 
 
—  What is your most favourite feature/improvement in Firebird 3?
 
— It is too early to say. There is so much new stuff in v3 that it will take me a while to get on top of it all. Probably best to ask me in about two years time :) 

Register to Firebird 2014 Conference!
 The next guest is Paul Reeves (IBPhoenix).
 
— Paul, why do you think people will be interested most of all in your presentations?
 
— Well, I've always been fascinated by trying to measure firebird performance. This year I've spent quite a bit of time working on a test harness that produces consistent output, and above all, a database to store and analyse the data produced by the tests. The results are quite surprising and to me at least, very interesting. I'm certainly enjoying putting the presentation together and hopefully it will be enjoyable for people to sit through.
 
— What do you like most of all in Firebird?
 
— The pace of development. I know we seem to be behind schedule on v3 but I'm barely up to speed with the new features that have been added in v2.n. A lot of the things that used to be difficult back in the day (I've been using Firebird since IB4) are so easy now. The way text blobs can be converted to and from strings, the way sql statements can be constructed on the fly in stored procedures, the fact that domains can now be used consistently in SPs — these are just a few of the things that make database development easier. And of course there are monitoring tables, db and txn triggers. And loads more stuff besides. 
 
—  What is your most favourite feature/improvement in Firebird 3?
 
— It is too early to say. There is so much new stuff in v3 that it will take me a while to get on top of it all. Probably best to ask me in about two years time :) 

Register to Firebird 2014 Conference!
September 25, 2014
We are starting series or mini-interviews with speakers of Firebird International Conference 2014. The first guest is Ann W. Harrison:
 
— Ann, what do you think people will be interested most of all in your presentation/talk?
 
Both talks address concerns that are of interest the most novice of Firebird users ("Why does gfix think my database is broken?" and "What's the big deal about multi-threading").  The talks start with the basics and then move into more complex understanding of the underlying issues (careful write, threading alternatives) that may suggest future directions for Firebird. Jim Starkey and I will share both talks.  I'll address the way things are now, using my experience on the Firebird Support list to respond to common questions.  Jim will talk about his post-Firebird experiences — he's written four more relational databases, each with different ways of dealing with on-disk consistency (the gfix issue) and threading.
 
— What do you like most of all in Firebird? and what is your most favourite feature/improvement in Firebird 3?
 
— The best feature of Firebird, from my perspective, is that it doesn't fight back.  It's easy to install, requires very little tuning, and runs on lots of different platforms in multiple configurations: embedded, classic, and now multi-theaded server.  Performance and reliability are givens — without them, you can't have a product. I also like the fact that Firebird can be distributed with commercial products without a license fee, so it's attractive to application builders outside the US. As for V3, beyond question, my favorite feature is the multi-threaded shared server.  Giving users the full use of their multi-processor servers without the overhead of a process per connection really moves Firebird into a new era.
 
— Thank you, and see you soon in Prague!
We are starting series or mini-interviews with speakers of Firebird International Conference 2014. The first guest is Ann W. Harrison:
 
— Ann, what do you think people will be interested most of all in your presentation/talk?
 
Both talks address concerns that are of interest the most novice of Firebird users ("Why does gfix think my database is broken?" and "What's the big deal about multi-threading").  The talks start with the basics and then move into more complex understanding of the underlying issues (careful write, threading alternatives) that may suggest future directions for Firebird. Jim Starkey and I will share both talks.  I'll address the way things are now, using my experience on the Firebird Support list to respond to common questions.  Jim will talk about his post-Firebird experiences — he's written four more relational databases, each with different ways of dealing with on-disk consistency (the gfix issue) and threading.
 
— What do you like most of all in Firebird? and what is your most favourite feature/improvement in Firebird 3?
 
— The best feature of Firebird, from my perspective, is that it doesn't fight back.  It's easy to install, requires very little tuning, and runs on lots of different platforms in multiple configurations: embedded, classic, and now multi-theaded server.  Performance and reliability are givens — without them, you can't have a product. I also like the fact that Firebird can be distributed with commercial products without a license fee, so it's attractive to application builders outside the US. As for V3, beyond question, my favorite feature is the multi-threaded shared server.  Giving users the full use of their multi-processor servers without the overhead of a process per connection really moves Firebird into a new era.
 
— Thank you, and see you soon in Prague!